1. Navigating the Maze of Life Insurance

    Halloween mazeDouble, double, toil and trouble! Clair the Good Witch’s spell backfired and she turned into a cat (the main ingredient, toad warts, must have leaped past the expiration date). To reverse the spell, Clair will need to drink the hot green potion bubbling in the cauldron.

    Help your child navigate through the cauldron from start to finish to cool the potion so that Clair can drink it to break the spell.

  2. Dispelling the Confusion About Grow-Up® Life Insurance – Part 2, Coverage

    Meet Frankie – Gerber Life Halloween Storybook

    Second in a series of five blog posts

    Meet Frankie, aka “Frankenstein.” Frankie loves to smash things, which has earned him the dubious distinction of being banned from all of the porcelain and pottery shops in town.

    Can I increase my son’s life insurance coverage? Will it be difficult for him to buy coverage later in life?

  3. Dispelling the Confusion About Grow-Up® Life Insurance – Part 1, Premiums

    Meet Clair – Gerber Life Halloween StorybookFirst in a series of five blog posts

    Meet “Clair the Good Witch,” short for clairvoyante. We recently heard the wind whisper that her pastimes include sweeping, casting spells, and pinning photos of homemade brews on Pinterest. Today, Clair flew in to lift the spell of confusion that’s been cast on some parents and grandparents about life insurance premiums.

  4. Creative Uses for Leftover Halloween Candy

    Halloween candy leftoversHalloween has passed, leaving behind a mound of lingering treats in the homes of many families. To help keep your children (and you) away from too much sugary indulgence, here are some helpful hints for making good use of leftover candy:

    Comments are off for this post
  5. Halloween Tips to Encourage Fun, Not Fear

    Toddler in Lion CostumeFor some children, Halloween is the most enjoyable night of the year. For others, whether toddlers or older children, the holiday creates fear not fun, and its sights and sounds can stir feelings of anxiety and apprehension.

    One study has found that most parents underestimate how frightening the holiday can be for children.

    A study in 2005 of 6- and 7-year-olds in Philadelphia by Cindy Dell Clark, a psychologist at Pennsylvania State University found that some children are unwilling participants in Halloween rituals and that the key driver of fear is the holiday’s focus on death. For youngsters who haven’t yet been exposed to funerals, Halloween may be their introduction.

    Comments are off for this post
    Categories: Health & Safety