1. Creative Uses for Leftover Halloween Candy

    Halloween candy leftoversHalloween has passed, leaving behind a mound of lingering treats in the homes of many families. To help keep your children (and you) away from too much sugary indulgence, here are some helpful hints for making good use of leftover candy:

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  2. Halloween Tips to Encourage Fun, Not Fear

    Toddler in Lion CostumeFor some children, Halloween is the most enjoyable night of the year. For others, whether toddlers or older children, the holiday creates fear not fun, and its sights and sounds can stir feelings of anxiety and apprehension.

    One study has found that most parents underestimate how frightening the holiday can be for children.

    A study in 2005 of 6- and 7-year-olds in Philadelphia by Cindy Dell Clark, a psychologist at Pennsylvania State University found that some children are unwilling participants in Halloween rituals and that the key driver of fear is the holiday’s focus on death. For youngsters who haven’t yet been exposed to funerals, Halloween may be their introduction.

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    Categories: Health & Safety
  3. Save Money with Trash-to-Treasure Halloween Decorations

    Children Trick-or-TreatingHalloween can be a frightful drain on the family budget, what with candy for the trick-or-treaters, decorations for the home and costumes for the kids. This Halloween season, try saving money by reusing some items destined for the trash or recycling bins to create decorations.

    Here are a few ideas for DIY Halloween crafts:

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    Categories: Parenting Tips
  4. Got Ghosts? Hit the Road for Haunted Places

    Haunted House SignDo you believe in ghosts? During the Halloween season, the politically correct answer is a resounding “Yes!” Even if you think hauntings are hokum, you might want to take the family on a fun outing that centers on ghosts and the paranormal. After all, it sometimes can be fun to get scared out of your wits.

    Ghost tourism in the United States has been fueled of late by popular television shows such as “Ghost Hunters” and “Ghost Adventures,” but fascination with the paranormal is nothing new. Throughout the ages, literature has given us classic ghost stories, from Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” to Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” to Stephen King’s “The Shining.”

    Nowadays, many communities celebrate Halloween with ghost-story hour at the library, haunted houses populated by ghostly characters, and showings of classic movies whose main characters are ghosts. Or, head to the countryside to get spooked on a haunted hay ride or in a haunted corn maze. All of those activities make for great family fun.

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    Categories: Parenting Tips
     
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  5. Happy Haunting: Halloween Traditions are filled with tricks and treats

    Girl in Halloween CostumeGet ready to welcome ghosts and ghouls. Prepare to indulge in the gory and the grotesque, and the walking pumpkins. Halloween is upon us again.

    This bewitching holiday marked on October 31 dates back more than 2,000 years, to Celtic celebrations of the harvest and the coming of winter. It was known as “All Hallows’ Eve,” since it fell on the eve of the Christian observance of All Saint’s Day, November 1.

    Halloween is steeped in traditions and customs, and the boundaries blur between the worlds of the living and the dead. This focus on the mystical and macabre has spawned the holiday’s association with scary characters such as ghosts, witches, warlocks, vampires and zombies.

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    Categories: Parenting Tips
     
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