1. What’s Been Done to Stop Bullying So Far?

    Girl being picked on by classmates As a parent, you’ve probably seen a story about bullying in the news just about every day. Although once seen as a minor issue that children just had to deal with, bullying is now viewed as a huge problem in our society. So huge, in fact, that STOMP Out Bullying, the leading national anti-bullying organization for kids and teens, has received support from numerous celebrities, including Katy Perry, Paul McCartney, and Ellen DeGeneres.

    It’s not just parents and celebrities who are concerned with bullying, either. Due to an increased level of awareness around the issue, politicians have started to discuss bullying as well. Here’s how they’ve attempted to curb bullying so far:

    Comments are off for this post
    Categories: Health & Safety
     
    Tags: ,
  2. Kids Are Sponges: Monitoring the Media Your Toddler Sees

    Family Watching TVChildren tend to absorb everything around them. As much as you may think your baby or toddler isn’t paying attention, he or she is likely absorbing any background activity or noise. That’s why it’s so important to be conscientious about how much and what kinds of media your child consumes at each stage of development, regardless of whether done actively, such as watching a movie on TV, or passively, such as playing the radio. The programming you select, including any adult media, can influence your child.

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) suggests that TV and other media should be avoided for children age 2 or younger. Instead, the AAP emphasizes that children should learn from play and from human — not screen — interaction.

    It’s therefore important for parents to determine how to regulate, limit, or monitor the media impact on children. Here are some tips:

     

    Comments are off for this post
    Categories: Parenting Tips
  3. Identifying Danger: Teaching toddlers to be safe

    Babies and toddlers have very little concept of danger, evidenced by the way they may walk into – or sometimes lunge off of – objects without fear of falling or injury. As important as it is to teach toddlers about eating healthy foods and good manners, it’s also essential that they understand how to avoid harming themselves and how to address danger.

    Comments are off for this post
    Categories: Health & Safety
  4. Is It Safe to Co-sleep with Your Baby?

    Mom & Baby Co-sleeping New parents often find themselves losing sleep over late-night wake-up calls, whether to feed a hungry baby or lull one back to sleep. It follows that moms and dads may turn to co-sleeping with their baby to make nighttime feedings easier or to help a nursing mother and her baby get on the same sleep cycle.

     

    Is co-sleeping with your baby safe? Evidence-based research and experts say no.

     

    Co-sleeping puts babies at risk of suffocation and strangulation, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Although research is ongoing to determine if there’s a connection between co-sleeping and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), it has been shown that co-sleeping increases the likelihood of accidental death.

     

    Comments are off for this post
    Categories: Health & Safety
  5. Is it Safe to Take Your Baby to the Beach?

    Baby Wearing Sun-Protective ClothingBabies are often more susceptible than adults to short- and long-term damage from ultraviolet (UV) rays, due to the delicateness of their skin. However, that doesn’t mean your family has to ban the beach altogether. In fact, there are benefits to taking babies who are at least a few months old to the beach. The texture of the sand, the sound of the waves, and salty ocean air all provide rich sensory experiences that aid in your baby’s development.

    Instead of ruling out the beach for your baby this summer, follow these tips for safe fun in the sun:

    Comments are off for this post
    Categories: Health & Safety