1. Preparing for Whatever Weather New Parents May Encounter

    New Mom With BabyNew parents have a lot on their minds: making sure that their babies are well cared for, keeping the house tidy, keeping themselves healthy, and getting enough sleep to make it all happen. During those first weeks of new parenthood, some things inevitably may fall by the wayside, but one thing that should not go unattended is insurance.

    Here are some of the kinds of insurance that new parents should have, to help prepare for whatever weather the future may bring:

  2. Transitioning Back to Your Day Job After Maternity Leave

    Mom and Baby BoyReturning to work after maternity leave can be difficult and filled with mixed emotions, even for the most organized of moms. Finding a good caregiver, adjusting to your previous work schedule, and getting yourself and baby ready each morning are just some of the challenges that many new moms face. With a little planning, you can be back on top of your game in no time. Below are a few tips to help make your transition back to work seamless, for both you and your newborn.

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    Categories: Parenting Tips
  3. Feeling Like ‘You’ Again After Becoming a New Parent

    Mom & NewbornA recent article in The New York Times caused a stir online and, possibly, in many households, too. The article, “The Trauma of Parenthood,” cited recent studies linking new parenthood to depression. Although this is commonly referred to as “postpartum depression,” The Times article said that the depression the studies identified were not hormonal in nature. Rather, the studies linked depression to the activity of parenting and noted that both men and women have similar experiences.

    Parenting can be an all-consuming labor of love. With time, you can get back to feeling like “you” again.

    Here are six tips to help ease the transition into new parenthood:

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    Categories: Parenting Tips
  4. Research Shows That Early Births Without Medical Cause May Lead to Infant Health Complications

    Newborn Laying in IncubatorMedical researchers have found that the number of early births without medical cause is on the rise, as is the number of studies linking health complications to babies delivered before 40 weeks of gestation (pregnancy), compared to babies born after the full gestation period.

    According to a journal article in Medical Care, published by the American Public Health Association, a study found that 7.3 million babies were born before their full-term was complete.  

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    Categories: Health & Safety
  5. Is It Safe to Co-sleep with Your Baby?

    Mom & Baby Co-sleeping New parents often find themselves losing sleep over late-night wake-up calls, whether to feed a hungry baby or lull one back to sleep. It follows that moms and dads may turn to co-sleeping with their baby to make nighttime feedings easier or to help a nursing mother and her baby get on the same sleep cycle.

     

    Is co-sleeping with your baby safe? Evidence-based research and experts say no.

     

    Co-sleeping puts babies at risk of suffocation and strangulation, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Although research is ongoing to determine if there’s a connection between co-sleeping and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), it has been shown that co-sleeping increases the likelihood of accidental death.

     

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    Categories: Health & Safety