1. Admission Denied: What to Do if Your Child Gets Waitlisted

    Student Receives Waitlist Notice From College Getting waitlisted is not the end of the world. In fact, the National Association of College Admissions Counselors found that 39 percent of colleges put some students on a waitlist in 2009. Once college admissions committees know that they have the space to admit more students, they turn to their waitlist of college applicants and reevaluate whom they want to admit.

    If your child has been waitlisted, there are several considerations to help you determine whether to wait or move on to Plan B:

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    Categories: College Planning
  2. Parenting College-Age Children

    Mom & College Age DaughterAs recent high school graduates prepare for college or full-time work, they may be ready to break from the reins of family life and discover who they are away from the family nest. This can be extremely challenging for parents who are used to helping their children deal with every drama and emergency, real or imagined.

    College-age children still need parental guidance and support. The question is how to support them and how much support to give.

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    Categories: Parenting Tips
  3. The New SAT Focuses on College Readiness – Is it a Good Thing?

    Students Writing an EssayThe SAT is getting a makeover. In Spring 2016, students will take an SAT designed to focus on lessons learned in school, such as analysis and applied logic. Among the eight key changes: defining words in context, demonstrating a command of evidence, writing an essay that analyzes a source, and focusing on math that “matters most” – all grounded in real-world contexts.

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    Categories: College Planning
  4. How to Start a Gerber Life College Plan in Three Easy Steps

    chalkboard with steps of starting a Gerber Life College Plan The Gerber Life College Plan1 is an endowment life insurance policy that provides a guaranteed payout* at maturity that can be used for college expenses or for anything else, without penalty. You choose the time frame and the payment amount, so you’ll know exactly how much money will be available upon maturity.

  5. Should Earning Potential Determine Your Child’s Major?

    teenage girl holding paperFor some students, choosing a college major is one of the most difficult decisions to make; akin to the timeless question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” As a parent, you want your child to choose an area of study that he or she will be passionate about and that will lead to great prospects for employment.

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    Categories: College Planning