1. Teaching Your Child to Learn the Difference Between Verbal Bullying and Constructive Criticism

    Child bullied by a group There’s an old rhyme that children learned to use if they were called a name while they were growing up. You may know it already. It goes like this: “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.

    The rhyme of course means that since words can’t hurt you physically, they should be easily ignored. That may be wonderful in theory, but in reality it can be difficult to disregard a hurtful comment. If this is true for you as an adult, it’s even more true for your child, who may have to deal with verbal bullying far more often, while having less experience than an adult in how to handle it.

    Although verbal abuse tends to be discussed less than cyber bullying or physical bullying, it may be an even greater problem. According to the website dosomething.org, that’s because physical bullying starts in elementary school, peaks in middle school and declines in high school, but verbal bullying can remain constant from elementary school onward.

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    Categories: Health & Safety
  2. Learning from Struggle: Tips for Encouraging Your Child

    Female Basketball Player Shooting HoopsYour child comes home and you can immediately sense that something is wrong. He or she missed an important shot in a basketball game, performed poorly on a test, or struggled to learn a new song in band practice. As a result, he or she may be reluctant to talk about what’s happened. As a parent, you can easily picture this scene, because you’ve lived it. If you’re a parent who hasn’t experienced it first-hand yet, you will.

    When something like this occurs, it’s important to pick your child up when he or she gets down. Although this seems like an easy thing to do, encouraging your child can actually be a bit more complicated than it seems. How honest should you be? Should you ignore talking about the event entirely? Would it be OK to help your child with the problem or should you let him or her figure it out alone?

    These are difficult questions to answer, especially when you’re dealing with a crestfallen child. If you have had trouble answering these questions in the past or think you might have them in the future, consider these tips:

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    Categories: Parenting Tips
  3. Overcoming Child Bullying

    Child Being Teased At SchoolWhether it starts with a sibling at home or another child at school, teasing is, unfortunately, something nearly every adolescent child experiences at some point. But when teasing escalates to bullying, it can often lead to long-term self-esteem issues that remain after the insults stop. While your child might not tell you that he or she is being bullied, there are certain indicators that you can look for as a parent, as well as actions you can take to help them dissolve the conflict – and build back up their self-esteem.

    Signs of Bullying

    There are three main types of bullying: Verbal bullying (insults or name-calling), psychological bullying (spreading rumors about a child to other children or purposefully leaving them out of group activities), or physical bullying (hitting or pushing). Here are some warning signs that your child may be being bullied:

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    Categories: Health & Safety
  4. How to Inspire Healthy Competition in Your Child

    Parents Smile at Soccer Player Holding TrophyYour child races up the stairs. You’ve never seen him or her so excited about brushing teeth before. But the act of brushing teeth isn’t what has your child so excited. “I’m going to beat you!” he or she shouts. That’s when it hits you. Your child has discovered competition.

    Although it’s completely normal for 5- and 6-year-olds to embrace competition, it can be a challenging time for parents. To make matters even more complicated, there isn’t a consensus among child experts about whether or not competition is beneficial for children.

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    Categories: Health & Safety
  5. How Confident Are You?

    Woman Raises Hands TriumphantlyConfidence isn’t just a trait that’s important for adults; it’s crucial for children, too. Kids that are self-confident are more likely to learn new skills, take on challenges, get along well with others, and expect positive outcomes from relationships. So, as a parent, you’ll undoubtedly want to help raise a child who has a healthy belief in himself or herself.

    Although there are a number of different aspects that go into raising a confident child, one of the most important is your own confidence level. According to Dr. William Sears, a noted pediatrician and the author or co-author of more than 30 parenting books, one of the best ways to raise a self-assured child is to improve your own self-confidence. Since young children learn from imitating their parents, you’ll want to model confident behaviors for your child.

    But how do you know if you have a healthy self-confidence or if it’s something you need to work on? Take this self-confidence test to find out where your current level is at and how you can improve:

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    Categories: Parenting Tips