Projects for Teaching Your Child About Earth Science

Girl holding science projectAh, the school science fair. You probably remember it fondly. Although those days are behind you, your child will at some point need to create and carry out his or her own earth science project.

There are plenty of earth science projects that will allow your child to learn while also having fun. Here are a few of our favorites:

Bake an Earth cake.

As a child, you probably learned about the different layers of the Earth and may have even built a clay model to represent those layers visually. Why not also bake an Earth cake, which can then be sliced open to reveal all of the distinct layers? Not only can this be a fun project for you and your child, but it also may win him or her “bonus points” at the science fair when everyone tastes how delicious the cake is.

We’ve found a step-by-step guide for how to bake a concentric layer cake from the website cakecrumbs.me. You also could watch this video for further guidance:

Create a “paper cup” anemometer.

Meteorologists use anemometers to measure wind speed. Your child could create a simple one out of materials that you probably already have in your home.

To do so, you’ll need five three-ounce paper or plastic cups, child-safe scissors, tape, a permanent marker, a single-hole paper punch, a pencil, two plastic straws, and a push pin. Once you have your items, follow these directions provided by the Southeast Regional Climate Center. In addition to teaching your child how to build an anemometer, the directions will also show him or her how to calculate wind speed by using it.

Create a rainbow inside your home.

For this project, you and your child can bring one of Earth’s most beautiful wonders right into your own home. By using items like a clear jar, honey and dish soap, your child will be able to “make a rainbow.”

You will likely have many of the items needed for this project in your house already. As part of the project, you also can teach your child about different densities in liquids. To start your project, follow this online guide from playdoughtoplato.com, which includes a list of the materials you will need.

Earth science projects such as these are bound to fascinate your child. Ideas for other projects can be found online, including on Pinterest.

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