The Gerber Life Parenting Blog

5 Ways That Procrastinating Can Be a Positive

April 17, 2019

how to procrastinate - girl studying

Here’s the scenario: You’re tasked with an assignment – maybe to plan an event for your kid’s school or to complete a big work project. Do you get to it right away or wait until the last minute?

Tackling tasks as soon as possible has merit. It’s certainly smart to check-off items from your list so that you can move onto the next. Yet, here’s the thing. Sometimes waiting isn’t so bad. There can be benefits to procrastinating but only if you do it correctly.

 

1. Can Lead to Getting More Done

Procrastinating is not necessarily synonymous with laziness. It’s simply taking your time to begin work on project, task or duty. Just because you might take your time doesn’t mean you’re not being productive. Procrastination at its finest requires being intentional and active.

For example, mental planning, daydreaming, or simply thinking or talking about the task can be very productive, especially since you can do so while taking care of other things on your to-do list.

 

2. Helps You to Prioritize

Taking some time before starting or completing a task could help you determine what’s most important, particularly if there are other tasks you need to accomplish or juggle. Comparing and prioritizing tasks can give you a better handle on the big picture and everything you need to do.

You may even decide that some tasks are just not worth doing, which would give you back a lot of time. Busy parents can use all the time they can get.

 

3. Spurs You to Be Creative

Jumping into anything too quickly could backfire, even if you have the best intentions. Coming up with the best or most efficient way to accomplish a task requires some brainstorming, which can be achieved through active procrastination. This doesn’t mean that you have to carve out time to sit at the table with pen and paper. It does mean that as you go about your day, you can brainstorm by letting your mind run free and making mental notes about options and ways for handling the work that needs to be done.

Let your subconscious do the work for you while you consciously delay starting it. You may be surprised by how much time procrastinating actually saves you and by the creativity gained.

 

4. Enables Making Better Decisions

While your mind may be rational and you can usually trust your gut, it’s a good idea to weigh all of your options before making a decision. Some of the ideas you consciously or subconsciously brainstormed can become viable options. They may not have come to mind if you had rushed into the project or hadn’t thought about it at all until right before your deadline.

Active procrastination can give you more time to find the best possible solution.

 

5. Gives the Task Purpose

When you’re assigned a task that seems menial, actively procrastinating gives you time to think about its purpose. Understanding why something needs to get done and who it affects can motivate you to complete it wholeheartedly. Understand the goal, keep it in mind, and work toward it.

If you haven’t tried the concept of active procrastination, test it. It may feel odd to both the passive procrastinator and the self-starter, but it also may make your busy life a whole lot easier.

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